At some point or another, everyone has experienced the feeling of bloat. It’s common to feel bloated after eating heavy meals, which is easy to do while going out with friends or during the holiday season when people bond over delicacies that aren’t always friendly to the waistline (but oh so tasty!). Fortunately, there are things you can do to help relieve your discomfort and send bloat packing so you can feel better and enjoy that extra bit of wiggle room in your clothing again.

5 Ways to Beat Bloat

  1. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

Drinking plenty of water is the easiest, and most important step when it comes to getting rid of the bloated feeling, and for your health overall. Water will help flush excess sodium and toxins from your body[1]. There may be a brief period where you feel like you’re bloating more, but keep on drinking that water! Once your body starts releasing it, you’ll feel better almost instantly! The more water you drink, the less your body feels the need to hold on to—aim for eight 8oz glasses a day or a bit more if you exercise!

  1. Consume Natural Diuretics

This one may seem counterproductive since we just suggested that you drink lots of water. However, consuming natural diuretics can help your body release excess water it’s holding onto (probably from too much salt). It’s a good way to speed up your body’s natural process to reduce the bloating. Don’t forget that you must still drink plenty of water, before AND after consuming natural diuretics to help your body stay properly hydrated and healthy.  Examples of natural diuretics include cranberry juice (real juice, not those sugary concentrates!), lemons[2], pineapple, cabbage (hold the salt!), and beverages such as coffee and tea (hold the sugar!).

  1. Potassium Powerhouse

Potassium offers many benefits. It can help reduce muscle aches during and after workouts (it actually helps nerves talk to your muscles![3]), helps your body utilize vital nutrients, and has positive effects on blood pressure, making it valuable for people concerned about high blood pressure[4]. It also helps reduce water retention! Because it helps your body utilize nutrients and function efficiently, it also acts as a natural diuretic and can help your body release excess water, without any rebound water retention. Good sources of potassium include dark leafy greens, bananas, and Ultra-Shake!

  1. Calcium and Vitamins

Low-fat dairy products such as skim milk are a great beverage choice if you’re trying to reduce bloating. Calcium, vitamin D, and the B Vitamins (especially B-6 and B-5) are not only essential nutrients, but they can help your body balance it’s fluid retention and reduce bloat[5]. Low-fat yogurt is great for calcium and vitamin D, while foods such as red meat (go lean!) and brown rice are good sources of B Vitamins.

  1. Drink Ultra-Shake!

No matter what your favorite flavor may be, our protein shake offers vital nutrients that help keep your body running at top efficiency. We’ve included 321mg of potassium to help your muscles (and reduce bloat!), B Vitamins, and calcium to help you fight bloating if you’ve consumed a bit too many rich foods. The ultrashake protein shake can help you get back on track, feeling better, and reaching your goals in no time!

 

 

 

 

[1] Better Health Channel, (2014). Water - a vital nutrient - Better Health Channel. [online] Available at: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Water_a_vital_nutrient?open

[2] Medguidance.com, (2014). Natural Diuretics | MedGuidance.com. [online] Available at: http://www.medguidance.com/thread/Natural-Diuretics.html

[3]  Nlm.nih.gov, (2014). Potassium: MedlinePlus. [online] Available at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/potassium.html

 

[4] Extension, C. (2014). Potassium and the Diet. [online] Ext.colostate.edu. Available at: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09355.html [Accessed 20 Nov. 2014].

[5] Better Health Channel, (2014). Fluid retention - Better Health Channel. [online] Available at: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Fluid_retention